Around and About Port Gaverne

The hamlet of Port Gaverne nestles in the valley immediately north of Port Isaac. Originally it was the more important harbour, but after the building of a pier during the time of King Henry VIII, fishermen moved their boats to the safety of its protection.

Port Gaverne cove with the clifflands of ‘The Main’ on the left and Port Isaac on the right.
Port Gaverne cove with the clifflands of ‘The Main’ on the left and Port Isaac on the right.

There is some fine walking along the cliff path towards Tintagel. The full 7 miles is one of the most strenuous sections of the whole south west coast path, with 7 valleys that rise around 300 feet. The shorter 30 minute evening stroll out to Welshman’s Quarry to watch the seabirds and the sunset is more suitable for the less active. You can always look north along the whole path from there and put the walk in mind for another day.

Welshman’s Quarry with the seabird ledge on the left of the inlet
Welshman’s Quarry with the seabird ledge on the left of the inlet
Looking north towards Tintagel from Welshman’s Quarry
Looking north towards Tintagel from Welshman’s Quarry
Looking back to Port Isaac from Welshman’s Quarry
Looking back to Port Isaac from Welshman’s Quarry

If you do not fancy walking all the way to Tintagel, you can drive to the fine beach of Trebarwith Strand. At high tide, the water reaches the road, but at low tide there is half a mile of golden sands.

Trebarwith Strand looking out to Gull Rock.
Trebarwith Strand looking out to Gull Rock.

A short walk over the hill is the historic fishing village of Port Isaac. It has featured in many film and TV adaptations, most recently as the fictional ‘Port Wenn’ of Doc Martin fame. There you will find shops, hotels, and restaurants. Narrow streets tumble down to the harbour where crab and lobster are landed daily in season and sold fresh from the fish cellar at the head of the beach.

Port Isaac harbour
Port Isaac harbour

A few miles to the west is the secluded cove of Port Quin. Several centuries ago, all the fishermen were reputed lost in a great storm, to leave behind a village of widows. The overgrown former fishermen’s cottages can be seen lurking in the hedgerows.

Port Quin cove.
Port Quin cove.

Polzeath is one of the best surfing beaches in Cornwall, and just a short drive away. For those newcomers to the sport, there are lessons available and wet suits can be hired.

Polzeath Beach
Polzeath Beach

A bit further afield at Wadebridge you can access the 17 mile long Camel Trail from Padstow to Wenford Bridge, a former railway line. Bikes can be hired at Wadebridge to try the 5 mile western route to Padstow right alongside the River Camel, or the longer route inland to Bodmin, or right to the end at Wenford Bridge. There are several places where you can get refreshments along the route.

Camel Trail near Padstow
Camel Trail near Padstow

The world renowned Eden Project with its iconic biomes, is always worth a visit and is about 50 minutes by car.

The Eden Project
The Eden Project

There is more information about all sorts of things in the bookcase in Seaways. Wherever you wander from Gullrock there is so much to see. The scenic value of the land and sea is complimented by the varied flora and fauna it supports.